Ghana @ 60:Governance and human rights in twenty-first century Africa

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Weight 0.600 kg
Dimensions 24.6 x 15.4 x 1.9 cm
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0.600 kg

ISBN9781920538743 Barcode9781920538743
Overview
Ghana was the first country in sub-Saharan Africa to gain independence and played a critical role in the political transformation and regional integration in Africa. Over the years, Ghana has transformed from one-party state through military rule to multiparty democracy. Since independence, despite internal challenges, Ghana continues to play a critical transformational role on the African continent.

Ghana was the first country in sub-Saharan Africa to gain independence and played a critical role in the political transformation and regional integration in Africa. Over the years, Ghana has transformed from one-party state through military rule to multiparty democracy. Since independence, despite internal challenges, Ghana continues to play a critical transformational role on the African continent. This influence has been reinvigorated since the emergence of the concept of African Renaissance and adoption of the ‘African solutions for African problems’ mantra in the early 2000s. On 6 March 2017, Ghana celebrated its 60th anniversary of independence from colonial rule.

Current circumstances in Ghana and Africa reinforce the argument that democracy and the rule of law are maintained by vigilance and involvement of the people. In this regard, this edited volume audited some of the issues relating to the state of human rights standards and compliance, democratic consolidation and development in Ghana as well as to bring forward how Ghana has contributed to the political, economic, cultural and ideological development in Africa.

Through a human rights-based approach to governance and socio-economic development, the book examines the experiences of Ghana, selected experiences of other African countries and the African Union in advancing good governance and human rights over the years, on the journey to attain shared prosperity for all. The book takes stock of major developments in the areas of political and civil rights as well as economic, social and cultural rights in Africa, the changing nature of democratisation, regional integration and pan-Africanism, and the ways in which the African Union policies may impact differently on governance and human rights on the continent.

Edited by Michael Addaney and Michael Gyan Nyarko

Michael Addaney is a doctoral researcher at the Research Institute of Environmental Law at the Faculty of Law, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China, and obtained an MPhil in Human Rights and Democratisation in
Africa from the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria. Michael is a professional development planner and a member of the Ghana Institute of Planners (GIP). He is also a staff of the University of Energy and Natural Resources, Sunyani, Ghana. His areas of research interest are: international human rights law, international environmental law and the intersectionality between climate change, urbanisation and environmental conservation in Africa. In the past, Michael has researched on refugee law, educational policy as well as urban management and governance in selected African countries.

Michael Gyan Nyarko is a doctoral candidate and academic tutor at the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria, where he is also the editor of the Centre’s blog, AfricLaw and Coordinator of the Litigation Unit. He holds an LLM in Human Rights and Democratisation in African (with distinction) from the University of Pretoria and Bachelor of Laws degree from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi – Ghana. Michael was called to the Ghana bar in 2011 and was part of a flourishing Pan-African commercial law practice headquartered in Accra, Ghana before joining the Centre for Human Rights as a master’s student in 2014. His research interests include law of international organisations, international human rights law, African human rights system, socio-economic rights, business and human rights, women’s rights, children’s rights, implementation of international human rights law in national systems, and democratic governance.

Additional information

Weight 0.600 kg
Dimensions 24.6 x 15.4 x 1.9 cm
Format

Pages

Size

Weight

0.600 kg

PublisherPretoria University Law Press (PULP) Publication Date01/12/2017

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